Classic Victoria Sponge? Yes please.

I know I know, its January and we are all supposed to be super healthy, but life is too short. And what am I supposed to do when I have extra double cream in the fridge? I can’t let it go to waste. That would be wrong.

There is something very satisfying about a Victoria sponge. Two layers of light and fluffy sponge baked freshly at home, brought together with a layer of jam and cream. Mmm. I used Mary Berry’s recipe for this cake and it works like a dream.

Although after baking this cake a few times, I have picked up a few tricks that have really helped me bake a beautiful light airy sponge. First of all I made sure that all my ingredients are at room temperature, so that my butter is nice and soft and easy to cream and my eggs are not too cold.

I use an electric hand mixer to whip up as much air into my butter and sugar because let’s be honest, my arms are just not cut out for the job. It really does make a difference and saves you a lot of time.

Lastly, I put both cake tins on the same shelf in the oven (luckily they fit) because then it ensures an even bake. And I was very careful to not over bake it. I hate a dry sponge don’t you?

Sandwich the two cakes with a layer of jam and whipped cream, of course the cream is optional, but when given the option why would you say no? And I know what you are thinking, why did I have double cream in my fridge in the first place? Well that’s another story.

Go on, treat yourself!

www.jbimagery.co.uk

Victoria Sponge

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Blueberries…a tasty topping!

We all know that blueberries are super healthy for us, but I have to admit I don’t eat them enough. They can be a bit expensive but I do think are worth it. I bought some recently and they are like tiny bullets of sweetness. Delicious!

Of course, the baker in me wanted to cover these blueberries with batter to make muffins or whip up a batch of blueberry pancakes smothered in maple syrup. But there was a tiny voice inside me screaming about how my hips didn’t need it. So I pimped my breakfast instead. Yes I know you are disappointed in me.

Just a handful of blueberries on top of your morning porridge or granola can really give it a lift. I had some homemade granola, topped with blueberries and natural yoghurt. I could have added some honey but didn’t want the sugar content to go through the roof. It was fresh and yummy.

I get bored of eating porridge every day so I am always looking for ways to mix it up. I also like to freeze the blueberries and when you bite into them they certainly wake you up! What do you guys have for breakfast? Let me know!

Thanks for reading and check out my portfolio at www.jbimagery.co.uk

Blueberries and granola w

Blueberries new shoot w

 

Diwali…The Festival of Light

Its Diwali! The time of lights, food and family!

Diwali is a great festival that is celebrated all over the world, wherever you might find Indians! Of course it is a lot more grand in India, but us British Asians give it a good go! I was born and raised in England so I consider myself quite British, however I have always been in touch with my culture thanks to my family. As part of a large community in the UK, we celebrate all the festivals all over England.

Diwali is a time where everyone would spend the weeks before cooking all sorts of sweet and savoury snacks for the big day. I remember my Mum and I creating a huge mess in the kitchen making Indian sweets, Chukri (savoury swirls), Karkaria (sweet discs), Bombay mix, biscuits and more! Our kitchen would be covered in flour and empty packets of butter, and we would be exhausted by the end of the day.

The best part was the unofficial exchange system we created from this. Our relatives would make the same snacks and we would all go to each others house and exchange food! It was a custom that brought us all together. We would offer sweets to anyone who would come to see us and vice versa. Let’s just say Diwali is not a time to be on a diet.

We would end the day with a big meal of masala fish and prawn or daal curry and all the trimmings. Chapatis, rice and poppadoms all finished with something sweet at the end, such as Gulab Jamun or Ras Malai (heaven)! And with our belly’s full to the brim, we would all stand outside in the cold and watch the fireworks.

Although I am emphasising how much Diwali is about food, it is nothing without family. The best part of Diwali is going to see all of your relatives that you don’t get to see often, or call those who are too far to visit. It is about welcoming people into your home and offering them food that you have made from scratch. It is about paying respects to your elders and remembering those who are not with you anymore.

This post is dedicated to my dear Mum who is no longer with us. Happy Diwali Mum x

www.jbimagery.co.uk

Diwali