Bored of Onion Bhajis? Try these!

Yes we all love onion bhajis in the UK but how many can we possibly eat? OK we can eat a lot but have you ever been tempted to try something different? These are potato bhajis and are super simple to make. They are incredibly crispy and can be a great snack or starter when you have people over. These are my absolute favourite and is something that your friends and family will just love. Just watch them fly out of the bowl!

Every Gujarati person will have their own recipe for this dish, but this is how I made mine.

Potato Bhaji Bhavisha Surti

I peeled two or three medium potatoes and sliced them as thin as possible. If you have a food processor or a slicer that can do it for you then I highly recommend it, if not a good old knife will do the trick. Just watch your fingers.

In a bowl, mix the following ingredients:

  1. 2 heaped tbsp Gram flour (chickpea flour)
  2. 1 tsp salt
  3. 1tsp turmeric
  4. 1tsp chilli powder
  5. 1tsp coriander and cumin powder
  6. 1 tsp ginger and garlic paste
  7. 1/2 tsp green chilli (chopped)
  8. A handful of chopped coriander

I don’t really use measurements so these are just a guide, if you don’t like spicy food then you don’t have to add chilli, just adjust the recipe to your taste. Add enough cold water to make a pancake batter consistency and then add the sliced potatoes and make sure they are all coated evenly.

And that is it. All you have to do now is carefully drop each slice of potato coated in the batter into a deep fat fryer or a pan filled with oil. They will only take a few minutes to cook and will come out nice and crispy!

Take this from me, if you are the one making these then try not to eat them all as soon as they come out of the fryer or you will get a stomach ache. But it was worth it…

Serve with a spicy chutney or ketchup for those who don’t like it too hot. Enjoy!

www.jbimagery.co.uk

 

Friday Night Curry…Butter Chicken

With all this hype about how butter is now good for us, I couldn’t not cook butter chicken and share it with all you lovely people. Now I don’t know if butter is good for us, bad for us, or simply tormenting us but what I do know is that it’s delicious and seems to make everything taste better. But yes, everything in moderation I can hear you say.

I based this dish from Jamie Oliver’s Food Tube video on butter chicken by Maunika but gave it my own spin. It’s such a delicious dish and if you are not a fan of very spicy curries, then you have to give this one a try.

I basically followed this recipe but used Pataks Kashmiri spice paste rather than a powder. You can get this in most of the supermarkets and it gives the curry a great flavour.

I marinated the chicken (for the whole day) in yoghurt, ginger, garlic and chilli paste, tomato puree, Kashmiri paste, lemon, salt, chilli powder turmeric, ground cumin and coriander powder. I then placed the chicken on skewers and cooked it in the oven to get nice and charred.

To make the sauce I fried a chopped onion in some butter, and once browned I then added a chopped tomato, ginger, garlic and chilli paste, tomato puree and the Kashimiri paste. I added different spices such as turmeric, chilli powder, cumin, coriander powder and let this cook into a thick paste. Next I added about 100ml of single cream to give the sauce a creamy taste. I let the sauce down with some boiling water and let it simmer. I preferred to do this than use lots of double cream so I would feel less guilty!

Once the chicken is charred I added it to the sauce alongside all its juices and its done! Add some fresh coriander and serve with naan bread or chapatis and basmati rice. Delicious!

If you are vegetarian you can always make this sauce and use hearty veg such as cauliflower and sweet potato. I like my curries a bit spicy but if you don’t then you don’t have to add any chilli, but go on…spice up your life! (Gosh that was cheesy)

Thanks for reading and check out my website www.jbimagery.co.uk

Please follow and subscribe!

Butter chicken 1 wButter chicken 2 w

 

Diwali…The Festival of Light

Its Diwali! The time of lights, food and family!

Diwali is a great festival that is celebrated all over the world, wherever you might find Indians! Of course it is a lot more grand in India, but us British Asians give it a good go! I was born and raised in England so I consider myself quite British, however I have always been in touch with my culture thanks to my family. As part of a large community in the UK, we celebrate all the festivals all over England.

Diwali is a time where everyone would spend the weeks before cooking all sorts of sweet and savoury snacks for the big day. I remember my Mum and I creating a huge mess in the kitchen making Indian sweets, Chukri (savoury swirls), Karkaria (sweet discs), Bombay mix, biscuits and more! Our kitchen would be covered in flour and empty packets of butter, and we would be exhausted by the end of the day.

The best part was the unofficial exchange system we created from this. Our relatives would make the same snacks and we would all go to each others house and exchange food! It was a custom that brought us all together. We would offer sweets to anyone who would come to see us and vice versa. Let’s just say Diwali is not a time to be on a diet.

We would end the day with a big meal of masala fish and prawn or daal curry and all the trimmings. Chapatis, rice and poppadoms all finished with something sweet at the end, such as Gulab Jamun or Ras Malai (heaven)! And with our belly’s full to the brim, we would all stand outside in the cold and watch the fireworks.

Although I am emphasising how much Diwali is about food, it is nothing without family. The best part of Diwali is going to see all of your relatives that you don’t get to see often, or call those who are too far to visit. It is about welcoming people into your home and offering them food that you have made from scratch. It is about paying respects to your elders and remembering those who are not with you anymore.

This post is dedicated to my dear Mum who is no longer with us. Happy Diwali Mum x

www.jbimagery.co.uk

Diwali

Unusual ingredients…Okra?!

It may be unusual to you, but to me I grew up eating Okra. I actually went through a mad phase of demanding my Mum to cook it once a week for me (is that weird?). My brother however is not a fan! I like to discover new ingredients whenever I can, otherwise I would just get stuck eating the same old thing.

Okra is a great vegetable, slightly weird and wonderful! Some people get put off by its texture or they don’t how to cook it. I grew up eating it chopped up with onions, potatoes, garlic, ginger, chilli and some indian spices. Served with some fresh chapatis, its delicious! There are loads of recipes out there with different variations, but this is how I have always eaten it. If you can’t make chapatis, it will taste just as good with some basmati rice or naan bread.

It’s good to mix it up in the kitchen. I get incredibly bored and don’t like to have the same old food week in week out. Unless its a classic, I will always try and adapt a recipe or try something different. That’s not to say it works every time though! Do you like to try different dishes each week? Let me know!

Thanks for reading and please subscribe/follow for more tips! Check out my website at www.jbimagery.co.uk

Okra

Chapatis!

Chapatis are a staple food in our Indian culture and is found regularly in our homes. They are so easy to make (after a bit of practice) and taste great with all different types of curries. Dipped in lentil daal or used to dive into a spicy fish or chicken curry, chapatis are delicious.

I remember when I was young, I would stand by the stove where my mother would be churning these chapatis out in no time. Perfectly round, thin and soft, it was like watching a professional. One after the other, they would come off the hot stove all puffed up and ready for me to slather butter all over it. I wouldn’t even wait to sit down and eat it with my curry, I would simply eat it right there. I think many of my fellow Indian friends/family would have the same memory!

Granted, I don’t put butter on them anymore unless I am trying to recapture my youth but I still love them. Simply combine wholemeal flour, oil and hot water, knead together and you have your dough. Different cultures make them in their own way, for example Hindus tend to make them thin and small, whereas Sikhs make them large and thick. Both equally delicious!

So next time you have a curry, rather than buying naan bread or eating it with rice, try giving chapatis a try! They can be cooked in a normal non-stick pan if you don’t have anything else. But keep the pan dry, there is no need to cook them in any oil or butter as they will just get greasy. But by all means slather them with butter afterwards!

Subscribe to my blog so you don’t miss my next entry and check out my updated website www.jbimagery.co.uk

Thanks for reading!

Daal and Chapatis